Category: Bible Reviews

Mere Churchianity: Finding Your Way Back to Jesus-Shaped Spirituality

Review by JN Anderson of Evidential Faith Mere Churchianity: Finding Your Way Back to Jesus-Shaped Spirituality “Fining your way back to Jesus-Shaped Spirituality” is what Mere Churchianity is all about. In over 200 pages Michael Spencer, aka. Internet Monk attempts to show us our need for us to become more Christo-centric. He also wrote the famous essay in the Christian Science Monitor called “The Coming Evangelical Collapse”. This book is the only book Spencer wrote before dying of cancer on April 5, 2010. Frank Viola, author of Jesus Manifesto, says “As someone who has been writing for years on the supremacy of Jesus Christ and its relationship to his church, I found the Christ-centeredness of this book to be profoundly refreshing. We have lost a choice servant of God in Michael, but heaven is the richer. I’m thankful that he left us this excellent contribution.” Spencer introduces the book with “The Dairy Queen Incident”. This title immediately got my attention since Dairy Queen is also in my home town and I also eat there quite a bit after services. Texas is DQ country. At any rate, he recounts a story of him as a youth pastor while his youth group and he frequented the local DQ. As is often reported, sadly, the youth group was not very friendly and damaged their witness. Later Spencer received a letter from a...

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Incomplete Commentary on Matthew (Opus imperfectum) Volume 2

Incomplete Commentary on Matthew (Opus imperfectum as it is known in Latin) Volume 2, Ancient Christian Texts is a translation from InterVarsity Press. It was translated by James A. Kellerman and edited by Thomas C. Oden. It is part of their Ancient Christian Texts series. This volume continues the Incomplete Commentary on Matthew and includes Matthew chapter 12 through 25. The Ancient Christian Texts series are translations of commentaries and sermons by early Church leaders that are translated into English. They allow anyone to study the writings of the early Christian writers and are intended for general and non-professional use by those that study the Bible on a regular basis. This commentary is called ‘Incomplete’ because the original work was missing everything beyond the end of Matthew 25, and had gaps between Matthew 8:11-10:15 and 13:14-18:35. It was originally written in Latin. The author is unknown, but it was originally believed to be John Chrysostom. The writing style does not match Chrysostom’s and the author refers to the book of Seth (from the apocrypha) in 2:2, which Chrysostom would not have used. Chrysostom wrote a book titled Commentary on Matthew, but it is unrelated to this volume. The Incomplete Commentary on Matthew is believed to have been written in the 5th century. Thomas Aquianas held this volume in high regard and it was very popular in the middle ages....

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Incomplete Commentary on Matthew (Opus imperfectum) Volume 1

Incomplete Commentary on Matthew (Opus imperfectum as it is known in Latin) Volume 1, Ancient Christian Texts is a translation from InterVarsity Press. It was translated by James A. Kellerman and edited by Thomas C. Oden. It is part of their Ancient Christian Texts series. The Ancient Christian Texts series are translations of commentaries and sermons by early Church leaders that are translated into English. They allow anyone to study the writings of the early Christian writers and are intended for general and non-professional use by those that study the Bible on a regular basis. This commentary is called ‘Incomplete’ because the original work was missing everything beyond the end of Matthew 25, and had gaps between Matthew 8:11-10:15 and 13:14-18:35. It was originally written in Latin. The author is unknown, but it was originally believed to be John Chrysostom. The writing style does not match Chrysostom’s and the author refers to the book of Seth (from the apocrypha) in 2:2, which Chrysostom would not have used. Chrysostom wrote a book titled Commentary on Matthew, but it is unrelated to this volume. The Incomplete Commentary on Matthew is believed to have been written in the 5th century. Thomas Aquianas held this volume in high regard and it was very popular in the middle ages. Each verse is given a lengthy treatment of commentary; so much that this translation had...

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Commentary of the Gospel of John

Commentary of the Gospel of John, Ancient Christian Texts is a translation of the commentary by Theodore of Mopsuestia from InterVarsity Press. It is part of their Ancient Christian Texts series. The Ancient Christian Texts series are translations of commentaries and sermons by early Church leaders. The ACT series is the first time these works are translated into English. They are written mostly for general and non-professional use by those that study the Bible on a regular basis. They allow anyone to study the writings of the early Christian writers. Commentary of the Gospel of John, Ancient Christian Texts is a translation of a commentary on the book of John from the late 4th to early 5th century. These writings were written in what is considered the Ecumenical Catholic Age (325-787 A.D.). It is expected that a commentary written within this time-period will defend against doctrines that were prominent at that time, or perhaps be colored by them. It was very interesting to read the views of someone in the 4th and 5th centuries. The commentary itself is largely theological. The book includes a lot of history surrounding Theodore’s writings, setting the scene of the time-period and showing the types of conflicts and opposition that Theodore faced with his theological views. For example, in his descriptions of the Godhead he spends a lot of effort showing the differences between...

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Chronological Guide to the Bible, Thomas Nelson

Chronological Guide to the Bible is the book form of the study notes from the Chronological Study Bible by Thomas Nelson Publishers. This book has the added advantage of working with any Bible. It includes the chronology of every book of the Bible and has information about people, places, and events, making this book indispensable for both chronological and archaeological study. Contents include chronological reading guides, book introductions, and outlines for every book of the Bible. The book is divided into nine epochs, which build a time-line from the beginning of time until the end. The epochs remain interesting through to the end of the book. This is a beautifully made book. It has full color on every page and the pages are a thick, glossy paper. The articles are very enlightening about the history behind each book, and of the cultures and customs of the time. This is a well written book. The information is easy to follow and understand, and held my attention. It contains plenty of Biblical paintings, pictures, maps, and time-lines, and makes chronology a very interesting topic. I highly recommend the Chronological Guide to the Bible.   Thomas Nelson Publishers provided this book for free. I was not required to give a positive review- only an honest review.  ...

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