Category: Bibles by Translation

Review: Fire Bible Global Study Edition

by Jonathan Ammon of Bible Reading Project The Fire Bible: Global Study Edition is a new edition of Hendrickson and Life publishers Fire Bible, aimed at filling the need for study Bibles in foreign countries around the world featuring the 1984 NIV text. The original Fire Bible was an edition derived from the Full Life and Life in the Spirit Study Bibles aimed specifically at students and those with less theological background. The Full Life Study Bible was originally published in 1992 and featured extensive study notes written Donald C. Stamps a missionary to Brazil ordained by the Assemblies of God. These notes were later edited and extended for a wider audience and republished as the Life in the Spirit Study Bible. This  Bible was then republished as the Fire Bible with the intention of fulfilling Donald Stamps’s first ambition which was to provide an accessible study Bible for international pastors and lay workers in countries which had little access to study materials, and specifically pentecostal materials. The notes in the Life in the Spirit Study Bible were altered once more to exclude cultural bias or references, present information in a way that was accessible to those from any context, and reword the text to be easily translatable (the general content of the notes and articles is identical). This became the Fire Bible: Global Study Edition, perhaps the first...

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Review: KJV TakeNote Bible

Review by Jonathan Ammon of Bible Reading Project The KJV TakeNote Bible (also available in a chocolate brown NKJV), a new wide-margin journaling Bible from Thomas Nelson, takes the grand old King James version and places it into a widely accessible journaling format for note taker’s and Bible lover’s. Though Crossway’s 2006 journaling Bible wasn’t the first on the scene (see Tyndale’s out of print Notemaker’s Bible) it made a splash in the Bible publishing world that took wide-margins further into the mainstream and introduced a format that appealed to avid note maker’s but didn’t intimidate the occasional scribbler. Thomas Nelson applied the philosophy behind the user friendly wide margin format and added a few improvements to make their TakeNote editions, which maximize current trends and advancements in Bible publishing. The most immediately noticeable feature of the Bible is its incredibly soft and flexible imitation leather cover. This is by far the best imitation leather cover I’ve handled. It’s both softer and more flexible than Crossway’s TruTone and features a handsome pebble grain finish. I was surprised by the suppleness, which easily performs the yoga position and allows the Bible to bend easily. It’s actually more supple than  some of the goatskin Bibles I’ve handled, and while this may not be a must for every reader it’s a great benefit when you have an edition that’s 7.5 inches wide...

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Cambridge Cameo KJV Reference Edition Black Goatskin

The Cambridge Cameo is a revision of the older classic Cameo. The original Cameo, which began production in the 1920s, had been unavailable for a while. Due to popular demand it was recently reissued, and it’s even better than before. Even though I expected to be impressed, I was still surprised by this Bible. I was very impressed with both its size and its quality. The Cameo has all of the features you expect in the larger Bibles. The Cambridge Cameo is both big and small at the same time. It has an 8-point font in a binding that...

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