Category: Commentaries

Fortress Commentary on the Bible New Testament

Fortress Commentary on the Bible New Testament is a commentary that takes a different approach than what is found in most commentaries. Rather than just telling the reader what to believe, it analyzes the setting and discusses how the text has been interpreted throughout history. The New Testament edition follows the same structure as the Old Testament edition: How the Commentary is Structured Topical Articles These set the stage for interpretation and discuss issues surrounding the text and setting. It covers historical and theological scholarship issues to the present time. It shows how different religious communities interpret the same...

Read More

Fortress Commentary on the Bible Old Testament Review

The Fortress Commentary on the Bible: The Old Testament and Apocrypha brings a diversity of perspectives and interpretations with the primary focus on a historical and cultural analysis of the text. It demonstrates a broad range of theological ideas and interpretations. How the Commentary is Structured Topical Articles Covers issues and concerns that shape historical and theological scholarship to the present time. Sets the stage for interpretation. Shows how two different religious communities interpret the same passage differently. Section Introductions OT Sections include Torah, Historical Writings, Wisdom, Prophetic Writings, and Apocrypha. Addresses literary and historical matters, and theological themes,...

Read More

How to Read the Bible Book by Book – Review

How to Read the Bible Book by Book by Gordon Fee and Douglas Stuart is a companion and continuation of the book How to Read the Bible for All its Worth. This book goes deeper into each book of the Bible in a unique way. Most books that cover all of the books of the Bible serve as a Bible survey- giving the information that students need to know without having to actually read the Bible itself. This book teaches students how to read each book for themselves and how to get the most from each one. It shows...

Read More

Incomplete Commentary on Matthew (Opus imperfectum) Volume 2

Incomplete Commentary on Matthew (Opus imperfectum as it is known in Latin) Volume 2, Ancient Christian Texts is a translation from InterVarsity Press. It was translated by James A. Kellerman and edited by Thomas C. Oden. It is part of their Ancient Christian Texts series. This volume continues the Incomplete Commentary on Matthew and includes Matthew chapter 12 through 25. The Ancient Christian Texts series are translations of commentaries and sermons by early Church leaders that are translated into English. They allow anyone to study the writings of the early Christian writers and are intended for general and non-professional use by those that study the Bible on a regular basis. This commentary is called ‘Incomplete’ because the original work was missing everything beyond the end of Matthew 25, and had gaps between Matthew 8:11-10:15 and 13:14-18:35. It was originally written in Latin. The author is unknown, but it was originally believed to be John Chrysostom. The writing style does not match Chrysostom’s and the author refers to the book of Seth (from the apocrypha) in 2:2, which Chrysostom would not have used. Chrysostom wrote a book titled Commentary on Matthew, but it is unrelated to this volume. The Incomplete Commentary on Matthew is believed to have been written in the 5th century. Thomas Aquianas held this volume in high regard and it was very popular in the middle ages....

Read More

Incomplete Commentary on Matthew (Opus imperfectum) Volume 1

Incomplete Commentary on Matthew (Opus imperfectum as it is known in Latin) Volume 1, Ancient Christian Texts is a translation from InterVarsity Press. It was translated by James A. Kellerman and edited by Thomas C. Oden. It is part of their Ancient Christian Texts series. The Ancient Christian Texts series are translations of commentaries and sermons by early Church leaders that are translated into English. They allow anyone to study the writings of the early Christian writers and are intended for general and non-professional use by those that study the Bible on a regular basis. This commentary is called ‘Incomplete’ because the original work was missing everything beyond the end of Matthew 25, and had gaps between Matthew 8:11-10:15 and 13:14-18:35. It was originally written in Latin. The author is unknown, but it was originally believed to be John Chrysostom. The writing style does not match Chrysostom’s and the author refers to the book of Seth (from the apocrypha) in 2:2, which Chrysostom would not have used. Chrysostom wrote a book titled Commentary on Matthew, but it is unrelated to this volume. The Incomplete Commentary on Matthew is believed to have been written in the 5th century. Thomas Aquianas held this volume in high regard and it was very popular in the middle ages. Each verse is given a lengthy treatment of commentary; so much that this translation had...

Read More
  • 1
  • 2

Subscribe

Archives

Logos 7

Pin It on Pinterest