Author: Randy A Brown

1 & 2 Timothy and Titus by Tyndale

1 & 2 Timothy and Titus is part of Tyndale’s Life Application Bible Studies series. It contains 13 lessons, study notes, and the complete NLT text for all three books. The study notes are from the Life Application Study Bible and include background, history, geography, and culture. The book begins with an introduction to the NLT. It then discusses the Life Application Study Bible and its features, explaining why it is unique in how it helps readers to apply God’s word to their lives including explanation (explaining the passage), the bridge (relevance for today), and application (applying the passage to your life). Next is the complete NLT text and notes for each of the three books. These look as if they’re taken directly from the Life Application Study Bible and include notes, references, maps, outlines, and more. This is a very easy text to read and the notes are thoughtful, applicable, and well-written. Next is a study guide. The study guide leads you in using the lessons. There are 13 lessons and they include topics such as leadership, building a strong foundation, prayer, training leaders, setting a good example, respecting others, money, character, devotion, being spiritual, building courage, etc. Each lesson is tied to a specific passage with notes and includes from 12 to 20 questions to answer. The questions are designed to make you think about the passages...

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Begat the King James Bible and the English Language by David Crystal

The King James Version is celebrating its 400th anniversary (1611-2011). In the past 400 years, the King James Version (KJV) has made a great impact on the English language. David Crystal, in his book Begat The King James Bible and the English Language, shows just how much the KJV has affected our language and gives many examples of words and phrases that are in our common in our daily speech. I’ve read the KJV for many years and I was still amazed at how much of our language comes straight from the KJV. Crystal covers words and phrases such as “let there be light”, “my brother’s keeper”, “two by two”, “thou shalt not”, “out of the mouth of babes”, “heal thyself”, “sowing seeds”, “fly in the ointment”, “seeing the light”, “nothing new under the sun”, “begat”, and many, many more. Crystal discusses how these words and phrases have affected our modern usage of language and the impact they’ve had on developing the English language. Crystal includes a comparison to other old English translations, which in itself is a fine comparative study. He further notes the importance and contributions of translators such as Wycliffe and Tyndale, among others. Crystal does a great job of showing how the King James Bible played an essential role in ‘begetting’ the English language. Highly recommended.   Oxford University Press provided this free review copy....

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Cambridge Concord in Black Goatskin, KJV

Review by Jonathan Ammon of Bible Reading Project Cambridge University Press has been publishing Bibles since 1591, twenty years before the King James Version existed. This rich publishing legacy has given them a longstanding reputation for choice quality craftsmanship. Their relationship with the King James Bible has lasted for centuries, and their current editions of the KJV reflect not only Cambridge’s classic quality, but also an aged elegance. Cambridge’s KJV Concord Reference Edition in black goatskin showcases Cambridge’s ability to produce an edition which exudes modern elegance with traditional class. BINDING The Concord features traditional goatskin leather, which is not only appealing visually and tactilely (and to the sense of smell as well) but is also strong, supple and highly durable. The Concord’s cover stands out as markedly different from the other goatskin editions I’ve handled. It’s suppleness remains about average for goatskin (which is still excellent), but the Concord features a rich, complex grain which is much finer than usual. The difference in the grain is noticeable and gives an organic look and feel to the Bible. This edition includes two ribbons, a sewn binding and beautiful red under gold art-gilt pages, which have all become standard features of the high quality Cambridge line. The Concord measures 9 x 6.4 x 1.25 inches, which is an excellent carrying and reading size, though actually smaller than most of the Bibles I’ve reviewed...

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Life Recovery Bible, NLT

Review by Randy A Brown of Studies In Scripture The Life Recovery Bible is a Bible with notes and features that are written specifically for people that are in need of recovery, or going through a recovery process. The notes are very applicable no matter what you are recovering from, including alcohol, drugs, or just about anything. It contains many articles and notes that are based on a 12-step recovery plan. The notes point out key elements from scripture that apply to the recovery process. It includes many helps and devotionals to build faith and confidence, and to help you understand your situation and how God can help you through it. The free review Bible I received from Tyndale is (roughly) 6.5 x 9.25 in hardcover. It is made well and is money well spent. The New Living Translation is very readable. I would recommend the NLT more for reading than study because it is a ‘thought for thought’ translation rather than a ‘literal’ translation, but as a reading Bible the NLT is great and it serves the purpose of this Bible well. The text is very easy to read, though it is not red-letter. I’m not sure, but it looks like maybe an 8 or 8.5 point font. It contains bold headings within the text, which are really nice. The features are what make this Bible really shine....

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Bible The Story of the King James Version by Gordon Campbell

Marking the 400th birthday of the King James Version, Bible, The Story of the King James Version by Gordon Campbell from Oxford University Press tells of politics, religion, translators, printer’s errors, changed lives, the impact the KJV has had on the English language, and more. Campbell gives a nice introduction to the history of the Bible in English, discussing important translators and versions such as Wyclif, Tyndale, Coverdale, The Matthew Bible, The Great Bible, The Geneva Bible, The Bishop’s Bible, Douai-Reims, and the great impact they all had on the development of the King James Version. I’ve heard a lot of information about the history of translations, but I don’t always hear about the translation process. This book gives insights on how the KJV was translated. Campbell introduces some of the translators and takes us through their translation process including revision notes, language, style, and he even shows pictures of some work-in-progress documents that includes hand-written notes. I found this section to be very interesting. Campbell talks about some of the most important and influential KJV Bibles that have been published, including the most important revisions. He discusses the KJV as literature and shows the influence the KJV has today, discussing topics such as the King James Only movement. Campbell does a great job throughout the book showing how the KJV is the most important book in the English...

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