Author: Randy A Brown

Cambridge Cameo KJV Reference Edition Black Goatskin

The Cambridge Cameo is a revision of the older classic Cameo. The original Cameo, which began production in the 1920s, had been unavailable for a while. Due to popular demand it was recently reissued, and it’s even better than before. Even though I expected to be impressed, I was still surprised by this Bible. I was very impressed with both its size and its quality. The Cameo has all of the features you expect in the larger Bibles. The Cambridge Cameo is both big and small at the same time. It has an 8-point font in a binding that...

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Cambridge Wide-Margin Hardcover, NKJV

Two attributes that I’ve always appreciated in Bibles are wide-margins and hardcovers. Cambridge University Press has produced one of the nicest Bibles with wide-margins and hardcover that I’ve seen. This model also happens to be in one of my favorite translations- New King James Version (NKJV).   Features of this Cambridge Wide-Margin include: Blue hardcover Sewn binding 56 ruled pages 7.9 point font Red letter 15 full color maps One ribbon marker Size = 7 ¼ x 9 x 1 ½ Version This edition is in the New King James Version (NKJV). The New King James Version is a modern update to the almost 400 year old (1611-2011) King James Version (my personal favorite). I would say the NKJV is my second favorite, although I use it almost as much as I use the KJV. The NKJV preserves the style of the KJV, while updating the language for modern readers. I like the features of the NKJV text: subject headings, center column references translation notes paragraph style OT text quotes in the NT in oblique type Poetry has an offset type style Cover The cover is blue hardcover. It has a grainy texture that I really like. I like hard-cover Bibles because they have excellent quality at a lower cost. In fact, most Bibles I buy are hard-cover. This one is sewn, so it lies flat when opened. Wide-Margin...

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Cambridge Concord Wide-Margin, KJV

Cambridge. The name radiates elegance. Cambridge University Press is one of the few publishers authorized in England to publish the King James Version (known there as the Authorized Version, or AV) of the Bible. Every company faces challenges in publishing quality. In this review, I put the Cambridge Concord Wide-Margin Reference Black French Morocco KJ763XM to the test. Will Cambridge deliver? Features of this Cambridge Wide-Margin include: French Morocco binding Sewn binding 56 ruled pages Pronouncing text 8 pt font Black letter Glossary 15 full color maps Translators to the Reader Gilt edges Two ribbon markers Size = 7 ¼ x 9 x 1 ½ — SPECIAL NOTE: The Bible in these pictures has thumb index, but this was added later. This Bible will NOT come with thumb index. — Version This edition is in the King James Version (KJV- known in England as Authorized Version, or AV). The King James Version will be 400 years old next year (1611-2011), so reviewing a KJV Bible made by a company that was publishing Bibles when the KJV was translated and published seemed appropriate to me. The KJV is my favorite. I use others (such as ESV, NKJV, NIV, NLT), but the majority of my work is from the KJV. I grew up with it. It sounds and reads like God’s Word to me. Cover The cover is black French Morocco...

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Bible Translations

Translating the Scriptures is not a simple task. Often, there is not a single word in English that means exactly what a word means in Greek or Hebrew. Words have a range of meanings, and the range of meanings can be much different from one language to another. This requires a degree of interpretation on the part of the translator. Some translations have more interpretation than others.   There are two basic types of Bible translations: formal equivalent (literal, or word for word) and dynamic equivalent (thought for thought). Some versions attempt to bridge the two. Formal Equivalence Formal equivalence, also known as literal, or word-for-word, attempts to keep as close as possible to the original languages. The goal is to make a text that is more accurate to the original and still be readable in the English language. They have a high reading grade-level. A formal equivalent doesn’t work as well for idioms and expressions because sometimes the point gets lost in translation. However, formal equivalence is far better for serious study because of the accuracy of words and grammar. Some basic literal translations include: KJV (King James Version) NKJV (New King James Version) NASB (New American Standard Bible) ESV (English Standard Version) NRSV (New Revised Standard Version) Dynamic Equivalence Dynamic equivalence, also known as functional equivalence, or thought-for-thought, attempts to translate the thought of the passage rather...

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